Softwood to revolutionize Pulp & Paper Industry

Scientists have discovered the perspective for Softwoods in order to process it further more easily into Pulp & Paper industry, if engineered properly it can propose reduction of usage on hardwood. The discovery was found in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences”, will enhance the economics of the pulp & paper by reducing industry’s considerable environmental impact. The discovery has widened the possibilities to pair some of the most economically desirable characteristic of each wood type.

Softwood Pine Tree

Softwood Pine Trees will help in reducing waste & energy for producing Paper. Image Source: galleryhip

According to John Ralph, professor of Biochemistry University of Wisconsin at Madison, altering was once a distinction of hard and fast between softwoods and hardwoods, which further process into large product streams that helped to create multi-billion dollar opportunities for the industries processing biomass for profit. Likewise most plants, hardwood trees such as birch and poplar contain lignin, the famously hard to process glue lend in plants tissues with their structure and endurance. Lignin is produced from the binding molecules of G- and S- monomers, while S-monomer produces a simpler and more degradable lignin. Since hardwoods posses both G- and S- monomers, they were traditionally used for their relatively easy to process into Pulp & Paper Industry.

Softwoods like pine or spruce produce lignin from G- monomers only, which is much harder to degrade and it renders softwood to process with great difficulty. Softwoods industrial advantage lies in their long fibers that are well suited in manufacturing strong paper products such as shipping containers and grocery bags. Moreover, Softwood produces sugar that can be converted easily and in higher volume to ethanol, thus making it potential feedstock for bio-fuels.

The research team could trace out one more interesting aspect from the lignin produced in the long fibered softwoods, as it is easier to process than the lignin found in the hardwood by using a model called Treachery Element (TE). This system induces suspension type of cells to make the secondary walls illustrative of those found in the real wood fibers. In the above study, researchers concluded that the transformed cells from the softwood pine within the TE system introduced by the genes of two key enzymes known to be producing lignin from the flowering plants, focuses on the resulting softwood capable of adapting the S-monomers that needs to produce a hardwood type lignin in its cell wall.

Researchers plans to adapt same methodologies to engineer actual softwood plants to produce S-monomers and with S/G lignins. The transition from a model to a plant is highly foreseen. If implemented in real plantation Softwoods, there would be decrease in intensity of pre-treatment processes and provides higher yields across different industries. It will further help in environmental protection with processing the biomass faster and more efficiently by reducing the significant amount of waste and energy.

Read more about Pulp & Paper Technology: www.pulpandpapertechnology.com/

Jacob Higgins
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Jacob Higgins

A blogger by passion follows the latest Industry trends and an explorer by choice.
Jacob Higgins
Follow Us

Jacob Higgins

A blogger by passion follows the latest Industry trends and an explorer by choice.

Jacob Higgins
Follow Us

Jacob Higgins

A blogger by passion follows the latest Industry trends and an explorer by choice.
Jacob Higgins
Follow Us

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